Even the healthiest of people get sick every now and then. But by fine-tuning certain aspects of your health routine, such as diet and stress management, you can help support your immune system's defenses against bacteria, viruses, and other pathogens that cause conditions like the common cold and flu.

Below are some simple tips on how you can boost your immune system

1) Reduce Your Stress Levels- Chronic stress suppresses the immune response of the body by releasing the hormone cortisol. Cortisol interferes with the T-cells (a specific white blood cell) to reproduce and receive signals from the body. Cortisol also reduces the antibody secretory IgA, which lines the gut and respiratory tract, which are our first line of defense against pathogens. To keep your stress in check, practice yoga, meditation or deep breathing in your regular routine.

2) Eat more whole plant foods- Whole plant foods like fruits, vegetables, nuts, seeds, and legumes are rich in nutrients and antioxidants that may give you an upper hand against harmful pathogens. The antioxidants in these foods help decrease inflammation by combatting unstable compounds called free radicals, which can cause inflammation when they build up in your body in high levels. Chronic inflammation is linked to numerous health conditions, including heart disease, Alzheimer’s, and certain cancers. Also, you can buy health care products online. Meanwhile, the fiber in plant foods feeds your gut microbiome, or the community of healthy bacteria in your gut. Furthermore, fruits and vegetables are rich in nutrients like vitamin C, which may reduce the duration of the common cold.

3) Get enough sleep- It is another natural immune system booster. Your immune system is like your computer — it needs moments of rest so it doesn't become overheated. When you're sleep-deprived, your body churns out stress hormones like cortisol to keep you awake and alert, which can suppress your immune system. People who got a full eight hours of shut-eye had higher levels of T cells than those who slept less, according to a 2019 study. Try to get at least seven hours of slumber a night, as a 2015 study, published in the journal Sleep, found that people who did so were four times less likely to come down with a cold than those who clocked less than six.

4) Limit added sugars- Emerging research suggests that added sugars and refined carbs may contribute disproportionately to overweight and obesity. Obesity may likewise increase your risk of getting sick. Curbing your sugar intake can decrease inflammation and aid weight loss, thus reducing your risk of chronic health conditions like type 2 diabetes and heart disease Given that obesity, type 2 diabetes, and heart disease can all weaken your immune system, limiting added sugars is an important part of an immune-boosting diet You should strive to limit your sugar intake to less than 5% of your daily calories.

5) Exercise often- Here's a good excuse to step away from that desk and move your body a bit: Studies suggest that moderate physical activity may decrease the rates of infection for viruses (including the flu and pneumonia) and bacterial diseases (though more research is needed in this area). There’s also more and more evidence that getting regular exercise has an anti-inflammatory effect on the body (possibly because it may lead to weight loss), as well as enhances immune function. You can also add nutritional food supplement in your diet while exercising.

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